SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

Council on Accreditation

Council on Accreditation

Council on Accreditation

The textbook on how to run a high-functioning laboratory can be found in the CAP’s Laboratory Accreditation Program checklists, the most rigorous standards for quality and accuracy in laboratory medicine. The 2017 edition of the checklists contained approximately 3,000 requirements used during inspections to help laboratories stay in compliance with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations and to help laboratories ensure quality testing for their patients.

“If the guidelines for predictive markers and their reporting requirements change, for example, we make sure to incorporate this in the checklists so pathologists meet the new requirements and understand the guidelines,” said Bharati S. Jhaveri, MD, FCAP, chair of the Council on Accreditation (COA).

The textbook on how to run a high-functioning laboratory can be found in the CAP’s Laboratory Accreditation Program checklists, the most rigorous standards for quality and accuracy in laboratory medicine. The 2017 edition of the checklists contained approximately 3,000 requirements used during inspections to help laboratories stay in compliance with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations and to help laboratories ensure quality testing for their patients.

“If the guidelines for predictive markers and their reporting requirements change, for example, we make sure to incorporate this in the checklists so pathologists meet the new requirements and understand the guidelines,” said Bharati S. Jhaveri, MD, FCAP, chair of the Council on Accreditation (COA).

The textbook on how to run a high-functioning laboratory can be found in the CAP’s Laboratory Accreditation Program checklists, the most rigorous standards for quality and accuracy in laboratory medicine. The 2017 edition of the checklists contained approximately 3,000 requirements used during inspections to help laboratories stay in compliance with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations and to help laboratories ensure quality testing for their patients.

“If the guidelines for predictive markers and their reporting requirements change, for example, we make sure to incorporate this in the checklists so pathologists meet the new requirements and understand the guidelines,” said Bharati S. Jhaveri, MD, FCAP, chair of the Council on Accreditation (COA).

In 2017, the CAP worked toward more personalization of the checklists for each laboratory. The CAP’s scientific resource committees provided the technical content through a collaborative effort with the Checklist Committee. While other organizations may publish standards every three years with few updates, the CAP stays on the cutting edge of new developments in laboratory medicine and technology. When molecular pathology emerged as a new discipline, the CAP included it in the checklists. We did the same more recently for next-generation sequencing.

These checklists go beyond the basic requirements for CMS approval to set the highest standards of quality. Still, the COA doesn’t want to establish guidelines that only a few laboratories can meet.

“We don’t want to be a burden on the laboratory because it is expensive and time consuming to meet these guidelines,” said Dr. Jhaveri.

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Bharati S. Jhaveri, MD, FCAP

In 2017, the CAP worked toward more personalization of the checklists for each laboratory. The CAP’s scientific resource committees provided the technical content through a collaborative effort with the Checklist Committee. While other organizations may publish standards every three years with few updates, the CAP stays on the cutting edge of new developments in laboratory medicine and technology. When molecular pathology emerged as a new discipline, the CAP included it in the checklists. We did the same more recently for next-generation sequencing.

These checklists go beyond the basic requirements for CMS approval to set the highest standards of quality. Still, the COA doesn’t want to establish guidelines that only a few laboratories can meet.

“We don’t want to be a burden on the laboratory because it is expensive and time consuming to meet these guidelines,” said Dr. Jhaveri.

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Bharati S. Jhaveri, MD, FCAP
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Bharati S. Jhaveri, MD, FCAP

In 2017, the CAP worked toward more personalization of the checklists for each laboratory. The CAP’s scientific resource committees provided the technical content through a collaborative effort with the Checklist Committee. While other organizations may publish standards every three years with few updates, the CAP stays on the cutting edge of new developments in laboratory medicine and technology. When molecular pathology emerged as a new discipline, the CAP included it in the checklists. We did the same more recently for next-generation sequencing.

These checklists go beyond the basic requirements for CMS approval to set the highest standards of quality. Still, the COA doesn’t want to establish guidelines that only a few laboratories can meet.

“We don’t want to be a burden on the laboratory because it is expensive and time consuming to meet these guidelines,” said Dr. Jhaveri.

“Ultimately, it’s the patient who benefits from these rigorous checklists. The patient is not a number. We want to make sure that every report the laboratory produces is a quality one and contributes to patient care.”

Bharati S. Jhaveri, MD, FCAP

“Ultimately, it’s the patient who benefits from these rigorous checklists. The patient is not a number. We want to make sure that every report the laboratory produces is a quality one and contributes to patient care.”

Bharati S. Jhaveri, MD, FCAP

“Ultimately, it’s the patient who benefits from these rigorous checklists. The patient is not a number. We want to make sure that every report the laboratory produces is a quality one and contributes to patient care.”

Bharati S. Jhaveri, MD, FCAP

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Ultimately, it’s the patient who benefits from these rigorous checklists. “The patient is not a number,” she said. “We want to make sure that every report the laboratory produces is a quality one and contributes to patient care.”

In the 2017 accreditation checklist edition, the Team Leader checklist was renamed Director Assessment checklist to better reflect the checklist’s intent of assessing the laboratory director’s involvement and oversight of the laboratory. The CAP made some of its most significant changes to checklists for the sections on personnel, specimen collection and handling, laboratory director responsibility and oversight, anatomic pathology, and molecular-based testing.

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Ultimately, it’s the patient who benefits from these rigorous checklists. “The patient is not a number,” she said. “We want to make sure that every report the laboratory produces is a quality one and contributes to patient care.”

In the 2017 accreditation checklist edition, the Team Leader checklist was renamed Director Assessment checklist to better reflect the checklist’s intent of assessing the laboratory director’s involvement and oversight of the laboratory. The CAP made some of its most significant changes to checklists for the sections on personnel, specimen collection and handling, laboratory director responsibility and oversight, anatomic pathology, and molecular-based testing.

sl_2_lab

Ultimately, it’s the patient who benefits from these rigorous checklists. “The patient is not a number,” she said. “We want to make sure that every report the laboratory produces is a quality one and contributes to patient care.”

In the 2017 accreditation checklist edition, the Team Leader checklist was renamed Director Assessment checklist to better reflect the checklist’s intent of assessing the laboratory director’s involvement and oversight of the laboratory. The CAP made some of its most significant changes to checklists for the sections on personnel, specimen collection and handling, laboratory director responsibility and oversight, anatomic pathology, and molecular-based testing.