SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

Council on Education

Council on Education

Council on Education

When Massachusetts General Hospital got its first Sonic Touch machine for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirations (USFNA), Martha B. Pitman, MD, FCAP, needed to know how to use it. She took the CAP’s AP3 with Susan D. Rollins, MD, FCAP.

“We had done a good job with palpation only, but sometimes we didn’t get a good specimen because we weren’t angling the needle right or the mass was deeper than we thought,” said Dr. Pitman.

When Massachusetts General Hospital got its first Sonic Touch machine for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirations (USFNA), Martha B. Pitman, MD, FCAP, needed to know how to use it. She took the CAP’s AP3 with Susan D. Rollins, MD, FCAP.

“We had done a good job with palpation only, but sometimes we didn’t get a good specimen because we weren’t angling the needle right or the mass was deeper than we thought,” said Dr. Pitman.

When Massachusetts General Hospital got its first Sonic Touch machine for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirations (USFNA), Martha B. Pitman, MD, FCAP, needed to know how to use it. She took the CAP’s AP3 with Susan D. Rollins, MD, FCAP.

“We had done a good job with palpation only, but sometimes we didn’t get a good specimen because we weren’t angling the needle right or the mass was deeper than we thought,” said Dr. Pitman.

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Susan D. Rollins, MD, FCAP
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Martha B. Pitman, MD, FCAP

Since she opened one of the first USFNA clinics in rural Tennessee, Dr. Rollins has become a renowned expert in the field. While many institutions used to rely on radiologists and endocrinologists to reach deeper lesions, now pathologists can be trained to perform the ultrasound-guided procedures themselves. Dr. Rollins’ educational programs through the CAP have helped pathologists nationwide integrate these procedures into their practices.

Dr. Rollins views USFNA as a good way for pathologists to practice medicine. It is the patient who benefits from pathologists developing this expertise with ultrasound.

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Susan D. Rollins, MD, FCAP
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Martha B. Pitman, MD, FCAP
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Susan D. Rollins, MD, FCAP
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Martha B. Pitman, MD, FCAP

Since she opened one of the first USFNA clinics in rural Tennessee, Dr. Rollins has become a renowned expert in the field. While many institutions used to rely on radiologists and endocrinologists to reach deeper lesions, now pathologists can be trained to perform the ultrasound-guided procedures themselves. Dr. Rollins’ educational programs through the CAP have helped pathologists nationwide integrate these procedures into their practices.

Dr. Rollins views USFNA as a good way for pathologists to practice medicine. It is the patient who benefits from pathologists developing this expertise with ultrasound.

Since she opened one of the first USFNA clinics in rural Tennessee, Dr. Rollins has become a renowned expert in the field. While many institutions used to rely on radiologists and endocrinologists to reach deeper lesions, now pathologists can be trained to perform the ultrasound-guided procedures themselves. Dr. Rollins’ educational programs through the CAP have helped pathologists nationwide integrate these procedures into their practices.

Dr. Rollins views USFNA as a good way for pathologists to practice medicine. It is the patient who benefits from pathologists developing this expertise with ultrasound.

“It’s exciting for me when pathologists see the value in it [USFNA] and can then demonstrate that value to other departments in their hospitals.”

Susan D. Rollins, MD, FCAP

“It’s exciting for me when pathologists see the value in it [USFNA] and can then demonstrate that value to other departments in their hospitals.”

Susan D. Rollins, MD, FCAP

“It’s exciting for me when pathologists see the value in it [USFNA] and can then demonstrate that value to other departments in their hospitals.”

Susan D. Rollins, MD, FCAP

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“If a pathologist finds a mass that looks like lymphoma, he or she can get flow cytometry done; and it becomes one-stop shopping for the patient,” said Dr. Rollins. “There’s financial savings and better quality care for patients when they don’t need repeat biopsies or open surgery.”

The program Dr. Rollins and other faculty lead is a two-day interactive session during which pathologists work with phantom or dummy tissues that have targets embedded deep inside. The pathologist uses the ultrasound machine to locate the targets and guide the fine needle to the optimal spot for sampling.

“The CAP and Dr. Rollins made it a professional, hands-on educational experience,” said Dr. Pitman. “We’re a major teaching hospital with trainees and fellows, and this program helped us keep pace with the training on FNA and ultrasound.”

The AP offers a new paradigm for CAP members, giving them a chance to develop deep expertise in an area of subspecialization.

“It’s exciting for me when pathologists see the value in it and can then demonstrate that value to other departments in their hospitals,” said Dr. Rollins.

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“If a pathologist finds a mass that looks like lymphoma, he or she can get flow cytometry done; and it becomes one-stop shopping for the patient,” said Dr. Rollins. “There’s financial savings and better quality care for patients when they don’t need repeat biopsies or open surgery.”

The program Dr. Rollins and other faculty lead is a two-day interactive session during which pathologists work with phantom or dummy tissues that have targets embedded deep inside. The pathologist uses the ultrasound machine to locate the targets and guide the fine needle to the optimal spot for sampling.

“The CAP and Dr. Rollins made it a professional, hands-on educational experience,” said Dr. Pitman. “We’re a major teaching hospital with trainees and fellows, and this program helped us keep pace with the training on FNA and ultrasound.”

The AP offers a new paradigm for CAP members, giving them a chance to develop deep expertise in an area of subspecialization.

“It’s exciting for me when pathologists see the value in it and can then demonstrate that value to other departments in their hospitals,” said Dr. Rollins.

sl_4_ultrasound

“If a pathologist finds a mass that looks like lymphoma, he or she can get flow cytometry done; and it becomes one-stop shopping for the patient,” said Dr. Rollins. “There’s financial savings and better quality care for patients when they don’t need repeat biopsies or open surgery.”

The program Dr. Rollins and other faculty lead is a two-day interactive session during which pathologists work with phantom or dummy tissues that have targets embedded deep inside. The pathologist uses the ultrasound machine to locate the targets and guide the fine needle to the optimal spot for sampling.

“The CAP and Dr. Rollins made it a professional, hands-on educational experience,” said Dr. Pitman. “We’re a major teaching hospital with trainees and fellows, and this program helped us keep pace with the training on FNA and ultrasound.”

The AP offers a new paradigm for CAP members, giving them a chance to develop deep expertise in an area of subspecialization.

“It’s exciting for me when pathologists see the value in it and can then demonstrate that value to other departments in their hospitals,” said Dr. Rollins.