SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

Council on Membership and Professional Development

Council on Membership and Professional Development

Council on Membership and Professional Development

From the time she was a young girl, all she wanted to be was a physician. For her being a doctor was not just a profession, it was a calling. Not until years later when pathologists diagnosed her only sibling with ovarian cancer and her mother with recurrent breast cancer did her purpose became personal.

“I look through the microscope at tissue on a slide, but I see the people on those slides and know that every diagnosis I make is going to directly impact the life of my patients and their families,” said Crystal A. Moore, MD, PhD, FCAP, a pathologist at the Hampton Veteran Affairs Medical Center and laboratory director for several private laboratories in Virginia.

From the time she was a young girl, all she wanted to be was a physician. For her being a doctor was not just a profession, it was a calling. Not until years later when pathologists diagnosed her only sibling with ovarian cancer and her mother with recurrent breast cancer did her purpose became personal.

“I look through the microscope at tissue on a slide, but I see the people on those slides and know that every diagnosis I make is going to directly impact the life of my patients and their families,” said Crystal A. Moore, MD, PhD, FCAP, a pathologist at the Hampton Veteran Affairs Medical Center and laboratory director for several private laboratories in Virginia.

From the time she was a young girl, all she wanted to be was a physician. For her being a doctor was not just a profession, it was a calling. Not until years later when pathologists diagnosed her only sibling with ovarian cancer and her mother with recurrent breast cancer did her purpose became personal.

“I look through the microscope at tissue on a slide, but I see the people on those slides and know that every diagnosis I make is going to directly impact the life of my patients and their families,” said Crystal A. Moore, MD, PhD, FCAP, a pathologist at the Hampton Veteran Affairs Medical Center and laboratory director for several private laboratories in Virginia.

As a member of the Professional and Community Engagement Committee and the Engaged Leaders Network, Dr. Moore graduated from the Engaged Leadership Academy (ELA) where she learned skills on how to effectively communicate her impact as a pathologist in the media and in her own hospital.

She has authored many articles and has been published and featured in USA Today, Forbes, Black Enterprise, Jet, Reader’s Digest, Prevention Magazine, Uptown Magazine, NBC News, and more. Her prolific media efforts to educate the public about their health and raise the visibility of pathologists were recognized this year at the CAP’s annual meeting where she received the 2017 CAP Outstanding Communicator Award. In 2017, Dr. Moore joined the ELA faculty and now trains other pathologists in professional presentation and communication skills.

sl_5_moore
Crystal A. Moore, MD, PhD, FCAP

As a member of the Professional and Community Engagement Committee and the Engaged Leaders Network, Dr. Moore graduated from the Engaged Leadership Academy (ELA) where she learned skills on how to effectively communicate her impact as a pathologist in the media and in her own hospital.

She has authored many articles and has been published and featured in USA Today, Forbes, Black Enterprise, Jet, Reader’s Digest, Prevention Magazine, Uptown Magazine, NBC News, and more. Her prolific media efforts to educate the public about their health and raise the visibility of pathologists were recognized this year at the CAP’s annual meeting where she received the 2017 CAP Outstanding Communicator Award. In 2017, Dr. Moore joined the ELA faculty and now trains other pathologists in professional presentation and communication skills.

sl_5_cmpd_drmoore_tablet
Crystal A. Moore, MD, PhD, FCAP
sl_5_cmpd_moore_mobile
Crystal A. Moore, MD, PhD, FCAP

As a member of the Professional and Community Engagement Committee and the Engaged Leaders Network, Dr. Moore graduated from the Engaged Leadership Academy (ELA) where she learned skills on how to effectively communicate her impact as a pathologist in the media and in her own hospital.

She has authored many articles and has been published and featured in USA Today, Forbes, Black Enterprise, Jet, Reader’s Digest, Prevention Magazine, Uptown Magazine, NBC News, and more. Her prolific media efforts to educate the public about their health and raise the visibility of pathologists were recognized this year at the CAP’s annual meeting where she received the 2017 CAP Outstanding Communicator Award. In 2017, Dr. Moore joined the ELA faculty and now trains other pathologists in professional presentation and communication skills.

“In medicine, we talk another language, but we must distill that medical talk into bite-size pieces and actionable items that people can take and use to change their lives.”

Crystal A. Moore, MD, PhD, FCAP

“In medicine, we talk another language, but we must distill that medical talk into bite-size pieces and actionable items that people can take and use to change their lives.”

Crystal A. Moore, MD, PhD, FCAP

“In medicine, we talk another language, but we must distill that medical talk into bite-size pieces and actionable items that people can take and use to change their lives.”

Crystal A. Moore, MD, PhD, FCAP

bg_image_bar_mobile

When Dr. Moore’s mother and sister died, she began to identify with what patients and their families really want to know from pathologists and how she can deliver those messages.

“In medicine, we talk another language, but we must distill that medical talk into bite-size pieces and actionable items that people can take and use to change their lives,” Dr. Moore said. “If one person gets a mammogram or Pap test, modifies their diet just a little, or stops smoking because of an article I wrote or an interview I gave, it will have been worth it.”

sl_5_moore_tv

When Dr. Moore’s mother and sister died, she began to identify with what patients and their families really want to know from pathologists and how she can deliver those messages.

“In medicine, we talk another language, but we must distill that medical talk into bite-size pieces and actionable items that people can take and use to change their lives,” Dr. Moore said. “If one person gets a mammogram or Pap test, modifies their diet just a little, or stops smoking because of an article I wrote or an interview I gave, it will have been worth it.”

sl_5_moore_tv
sl_5_cmpd_drmoore_tv_mobile

When Dr. Moore’s mother and sister died, she began to identify with what patients and their families really want to know from pathologists and how she can deliver those messages.

“In medicine, we talk another language, but we must distill that medical talk into bite-size pieces and actionable items that people can take and use to change their lives,” Dr. Moore said. “If one person gets a mammogram or Pap test, modifies their diet just a little, or stops smoking because of an article I wrote or an interview I gave, it will have been worth it.”