SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

Council on Scientific Affairs

Council on Scientific Affairs

Council on Scientific Affairs

A patient’s health depends on pathologists making the right diagnosis. And for cancer patients, a pathologist must accurately report all the pathological staging elements to guide the most effective treatment. In June 2017, the CAP released 52 updated cancer protocols, the largest single release in the CAP’s protocol history. These updated protocols reflect mandatory changes from the 8th edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual.

“Some pathologists have told us this is disruptive, but they’re appreciative that we released the cancer protocols early enough, giving institutions time to implement them in their cancer reporting systems,” said Thomas P. Baker, MD, FCAP, chair of the Cancer Committee. “We’re listening to feedback and updating the cancer protocols based on input from pathologists and clinical stakeholders.”

A patient’s health depends on pathologists making the right diagnosis. And for cancer patients, a pathologist must accurately report all the pathological staging elements to guide the most effective treatment. In June 2017, the CAP released 52 updated cancer protocols, the largest single release in the CAP’s protocol history. These updated protocols reflect mandatory changes from the 8th edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual.

“Some pathologists have told us this is disruptive, but they’re appreciative that we released the cancer protocols early enough, giving institutions time to implement them in their cancer reporting systems,” said Thomas P. Baker, MD, FCAP, chair of the Cancer Committee. “We’re listening to feedback and updating the cancer protocols based on input from pathologists and clinical stakeholders.”

A patient’s health depends on pathologists making the right diagnosis. And for cancer patients, a pathologist must accurately report all the pathological staging elements to guide the most effective treatment. In June 2017, the CAP released 52 updated cancer protocols, the largest single release in the CAP’s protocol history. These updated protocols reflect mandatory changes from the 8th edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual.

“Some pathologists have told us this is disruptive, but they’re appreciative that we released the cancer protocols early enough, giving institutions time to implement them in their cancer reporting systems,” said Thomas P. Baker, MD, FCAP, chair of the Cancer Committee. “We’re listening to feedback and updating the cancer protocols based on input from pathologists and clinical stakeholders.”

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Thomas P. Baker, MD, FCAP
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Thomas P. Baker, MD, FCAP

The CAP’s Cancer Protocol Oversight Project Team looked at the cancer protocols in totality to ensure consistency among different tumor types and streamline the content for reporting electronically or with manual systems. The CAP offers electronic cancer checklists and text versions of the cancer protocols at cap.org/cancerprotocols, allowing pathologists to integrate the content into their institution’s cancer reporting system.

“A patient can’t be treated optimally if important pathology staging elements are not reported,” said Raouf E. Nakhleh, MD, FCAP, chair of the Council on Scientific Affairs. “We’re working to perfect the cancer protocols because they help pathologists ensure they are reporting all the staging elements needed for optimal patient care in a format that can be easily read by clinicians. Pathologists are getting the worldwide-recognized standard, and they can have confidence in what they’re doing.”

Patients will often receive treatment at multiple facilities during their course of cancer care, and they need the right pathology information to get the appropriate care.

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Thomas P. Baker, MD, FCAP
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Thomas P. Baker, MD, FCAP
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Thomas P. Baker, MD, FCAP
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Thomas P. Baker, MD, FCAP

The CAP’s Cancer Protocol Oversight Project Team looked at the cancer protocols in totality to ensure consistency among different tumor types and streamline the content for reporting electronically or with manual systems. The CAP offers electronic cancer checklists and text versions of the cancer protocols at cap.org/cancerprotocols, allowing pathologists to integrate the content into their institution’s cancer reporting system.

“A patient can’t be treated optimally if important pathology staging elements are not reported,” said Raouf E. Nakhleh, MD, FCAP, chair of the Council on Scientific Affairs. “We’re working to perfect the cancer protocols because they help pathologists ensure they are reporting all the staging elements needed for optimal patient care in a format that can be easily read by clinicians. Pathologists are getting the worldwide-recognized standard, and they can have confidence in what they’re doing.”

Patients will often receive treatment at multiple facilities during their course of cancer care, and they need the right pathology information to get the appropriate care.

The CAP’s Cancer Protocol Oversight Project Team looked at the cancer protocols in totality to ensure consistency among different tumor types and streamline the content for reporting electronically or with manual systems. The CAP offers electronic cancer checklists and text versions of the cancer protocols at cap.org/cancerprotocols, allowing pathologists to integrate the content into their institution’s cancer reporting system.

“A patient can’t be treated optimally if important pathology staging elements are not reported,” said Raouf E. Nakhleh, MD, FCAP, chair of the Council on Scientific Affairs. “We’re working to perfect the cancer protocols because they help pathologists ensure they are reporting all the staging elements needed for optimal patient care in a format that can be easily read by clinicians. Pathologists are getting the worldwide-recognized standard, and they can have confidence in what they’re doing.”

Patients will often receive treatment at multiple facilities during their course of cancer care, and they need the right pathology information to get the appropriate care.

“A patient can’t be treated optimally if important pathology staging elements are not reported.”

Raouf E. Nakhleh, MD, FCAP

“A patient can’t be treated optimally if important pathology staging elements are not reported.”

Raouf E. Nakhleh, MD, FCAP

“A patient can’t be treated optimally if important pathology staging elements are not reported.”

Raouf E. Nakhleh, MD, FCAP

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“As cancer care evolves and requires more information about the tumor, a gap in pathology information may potentially delay care,” said Dr. Baker. “As pathologists, we’re focused on how our protocols benefit the patient.”

Because of the dedication of CAP members and partners, the cancer protocols have become de facto clinical guidelines for the appropriate reporting of pathologic features necessary for the treatment of cancer patients.

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“As cancer care evolves and requires more information about the tumor, a gap in pathology information may potentially delay care,” said Dr. Baker. “As pathologists, we’re focused on how our protocols benefit the patient.”

Because of the dedication of CAP members and partners, the cancer protocols have become de facto clinical guidelines for the appropriate reporting of pathologic features necessary for the treatment of cancer patients.

sl1_csa_microview

“As cancer care evolves and requires more information about the tumor, a gap in pathology information may potentially delay care,” said Dr. Baker. “As pathologists, we’re focused on how our protocols benefit the patient.”

Because of the dedication of CAP members and partners, the cancer protocols have become de facto clinical guidelines for the appropriate reporting of pathologic features necessary for the treatment of cancer patients.