LABORATORY EXCELLENCE

LABORATORY EXCELLENCE

LABORATORY EXCELLENCE

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No matter where patients are in the world, they can trust their laboratory results to be reliable and accurate becuse of CAP members’ dedication and expertise.

No matter where patients are in the world, they can trust their laboratory results to be reliable and accurate becuse of CAP members’ dedication and expertise.

No matter where patients are in the world, they can trust their laboratory results to be reliable and accurate becuse of CAP members’ dedication and expertise.

Advance Quality

People are healthier because of the CAP’s commitment to ensure laboratory quality and set high standards to improve patient care. Scientific rigor underpins all Laboratory Quality Solutions programs. Thousands of member experts, including pathologists and laboratory professionals, volunteer their time and expertise so patients can ultimately benefit from external quality assurance and accreditation. The entire laboratory community around the world is better because of the important work CAP members do.

In 2017, more than 20,000 laboratories enrolled in proficiency testing (PT) programs, and the CAP accredited more than 8,000 laboratories worldwide. CAP members are both the designers and participants of these laboratory improvement programs. The Council on Scientific Affairs generated more than 600 appointed positions for pathologists to serve in. The Council on Accreditation assigned more than 2,000 pathologists and laboratory professionals to inspection teams.

More laboratories and health systems are recognizing the value of integrated improvement programs and are choosing to become CAP accredited and to exclusively use CAP PT. No matter where patients are in the world, they can trust their laboratory results to be reliable and accurate because of CAP members’ dedication and expertise.

Advance Quality

People are healthier because of the CAP’s commitment to ensure laboratory quality and set high standards to improve patient care. Scientific rigor underpins all Laboratory Quality Solutions programs. Thousands of member experts, including pathologists and laboratory professionals, volunteer their time and expertise so patients can ultimately benefit from external quality assurance and accreditation. The entire laboratory community around the world is better because of the important work CAP members do.

In 2017, more than 20,000 laboratories enrolled in proficiency testing (PT) programs, and the CAP accredited more than 8,000 laboratories worldwide. CAP members are both the designers and participants of these laboratory improvement programs. The Council on Scientific Affairs generated more than 600 appointed positions for pathologists to serve in. The Council on Accreditation assigned more than 2,000 pathologists and laboratory professionals to inspection teams.

More laboratories and health systems are recognizing the value of integrated improvement programs and are choosing to become CAP accredited and to exclusively use CAP PT. No matter where patients are in the world, they can trust their laboratory results to be reliable and accurate because of CAP members’ dedication and expertise.

Advance Quality

People are healthier because of the CAP’s commitment to ensure laboratory quality and set high standards to improve patient care. Scientific rigor underpins all Laboratory Quality Solutions programs. Thousands of member experts, including pathologists and laboratory professionals, volunteer their time and expertise so patients can ultimately benefit from external quality assurance and accreditation. The entire laboratory community around the world is better because of the important work CAP members do.

In 2017, more than 20,000 laboratories enrolled in proficiency testing (PT) programs, and the CAP accredited more than 8,000 laboratories worldwide. CAP members are both the designers and participants of these laboratory improvement programs. The Council on Scientific Affairs generated more than 600 appointed positions for pathologists to serve in. The Council on Accreditation assigned more than 2,000 pathologists and laboratory professionals to inspection teams.

More laboratories and health systems are recognizing the value of integrated improvement programs and are choosing to become CAP accredited and to exclusively use CAP PT. No matter where patients are in the world, they can trust their laboratory results to be reliable and accurate because of CAP members’ dedication and expertise.

Record Number of Cancer Protocols Released

More than 200 pathologists and clinicians collaborated to revise more than 52 of the CAP Cancer Protocols and electronic Cancer Checklists (eCC) to reflect content from the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual, 8th edition. These protocols provide guidance for collecting essential data elements for complete reporting on malignant tumors, directing effective treatment for patients.

CAP members served on review panels and offered feedback to improve the elements included in the protocols. One key factor that members influenced was timing. The AJCC originally asked pathologists to implement a whole new staging system in just three months. That’s when CAP members spoke up to explain how that short time period would adversely impact pathologists, registrars, and other protocol users. Based on this feedback and the AJCC’s agreement to delay the implementation, the CAP was able to release the updated protocols six months ahead of the AJCC implementation date of January 1, 2018, allowing pathologists, organizations, and anatomic laboratory information system vendors sufficient time to make necessary updates to their systems.

Both members and nonmembers offered feedback during an open comment period on specific elements of the protocols, such as the histologic type of the tumor, its size and margins, and all elements that impact staging and treatment.

More than 4,400 pathologists in the United States and Canada are now licensed to use the CAP eCC, the electronic version of the protocols developed to streamline reporting on surgical pathology cancer cases. More than 60 new sites became licensed in 2017. The Pathology Electronic Reporting (PERT) Committee and its staff continue to align with federal initiatives to help advance cancer reporting quality, data sharing, and other work to improve patient care.

The importance of integrated and aligned cancer reporting was startlingly illustrated recently: Several provinces in Canada use the eCC exclusively and started noticing a stage of colon cancer that had higher incidence in one region of Ontario. After examining the data, they found it was happening at one institution. A surgeon there was resecting tumors incorrectly, leading to incorrect staging. The data told the story, and that hospital was able to educate the surgeon who then improved his clinical practice and patient care.

Another significant effort in 2017 involved the Cancer Committee, PERT, and staff working to develop a single source of truth for producing the CAP’s cancer reporting products. Both the Cancer Protocols and the eCC will be produced from the same content using a newly developed electronic tool that speeds up the release cycle and reduces the chance of errors.

Record Number of Cancer Protocols Released

More than 200 pathologists and clinicians collaborated to revise more than 52 of the CAP Cancer Protocols and electronic Cancer Checklists (eCC) to reflect content from the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual, 8th edition. These protocols provide guidance for collecting essential data elements for complete reporting on malignant tumors, directing effective treatment for patients.

CAP members served on review panels and offered feedback to improve the elements included in the protocols. One key factor that members influenced was timing. The AJCC originally asked pathologists to implement a whole new staging system in just three months. That’s when CAP members spoke up to explain how that short time period would adversely impact pathologists, registrars, and other protocol users. Based on this feedback and the AJCC’s agreement to delay the implementation, the CAP was able to release the updated protocols six months ahead of the AJCC implementation date of January 1, 2018, allowing pathologists, organizations, and anatomic laboratory information system vendors sufficient time to make necessary updates to their systems.

Both members and nonmembers offered feedback during an open comment period on specific elements of the protocols, such as the histologic type of the tumor, its size and margins, and all elements that impact staging and treatment.

More than 4,400 pathologists in the United States and Canada are now licensed to use the CAP eCC, the electronic version of the protocols developed to streamline reporting on surgical pathology cancer cases. More than 60 new sites became licensed in 2017. The Pathology Electronic Reporting (PERT) Committee and its staff continue to align with federal initiatives to help advance cancer reporting quality, data sharing, and other work to improve patient care.

The importance of integrated and aligned cancer reporting was startlingly illustrated recently: Several provinces in Canada use the eCC exclusively and started noticing a stage of colon cancer that had higher incidence in one region of Ontario. After examining the data, they found it was happening at one institution. A surgeon there was resecting tumors incorrectly, leading to incorrect staging. The data told the story, and that hospital was able to educate the surgeon who then improved his clinical practice and patient care.

Another significant effort in 2017 involved the Cancer Committee, PERT, and staff working to develop a single source of truth for producing the CAP’s cancer reporting products. Both the Cancer Protocols and the eCC will be produced from the same content using a newly developed electronic tool that speeds up the release cycle and reduces the chance of errors.

Record Number of Cancer Protocols Released

More than 200 pathologists and clinicians collaborated to revise more than 52 of the CAP Cancer Protocols and electronic Cancer Checklists (eCC) to reflect content from the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual, 8th edition.

These protocols provide guidance for collecting essential data elements for complete reporting on malignant tumors, directing effective treatment for patients. CAP members served on review panels and offered feedback to improve the elements included in the protocols. One key factor that members influenced was timing. The AJCC originally asked pathologists to implement a whole new staging system in just three months. That’s when CAP members spoke up to explain how that short time period would adversely impact pathologists, registrars, and other protocol users. Based on this feedback and the AJCC’s agreement to delay the implementation, the CAP was able to release the updated protocols six months ahead of the AJCC implementation date of January 1, 2018, allowing pathologists, organizations, and anatomic laboratory information system vendors sufficient time to make necessary updates to their systems.

Both members and nonmembers offered feedback during an open comment period on specific elements of the protocols, such as the histologic type of the tumor, its size and margins, and all elements that impact staging and treatment.

More than 4,400 pathologists in the United States and Canada are now licensed to use the CAP eCC, the electronic version of the protocols developed to streamline reporting on surgical pathology cancer cases. More than 60 new sites became licensed in 2017. The Pathology Electronic Reporting (PERT) Committee and its staff continue to align with federal initiatives to help advance cancer reporting quality, data sharing, and other work to improve patient care.

The importance of integrated and aligned cancer reporting was startlingly illustrated recently: Several provinces in Canada use the eCC exclusively and started noticing a stage of colon cancer that had higher incidence in one region of Ontario. After examining the data, they found it was happening at one institution. A surgeon there was resecting tumors incorrectly, leading to incorrect staging. The data told the story, and that hospital was able to educate the surgeon who then improved his clinical practice and patient care. Another significant effort in 2017 involved the Cancer Committee, PERT, and staff working to develop a single source of truth for producing the CAP’s cancer reporting products. Both the Cancer Protocols and the eCC will be produced from the same content using a newly developed electronic tool that speeds up the release cycle and reduces the chance of errors.

Data Drives Patient Care Decisions

With laboratories supplying the majority of data contained in a patient’s record, it is important for pathologists to understand the opportunities for data analysis within their organizations. The Informatics Committee continued to develop resources for members, including numerous education courses focused on informatics and information technology topics as well as a revision to the Clinical Informatics Resource Guide. The Informatics Committee also worked closely in 2017 with CAP accreditation programs on requirements from laboratories on IT interpretation of laboratory accreditation program checklist requirements. In addition, the committee’s active participation in standards development ensured that the needs of the laboratory were incorporated into laboratory information systems.

Data Drives Patient Care Decisions

With laboratories supplying the majority of data contained in a patient’s record, it is important for pathologists to understand the opportunities for data analysis within their organizations. The Informatics Committee continued to develop resources for members, including numerous education courses focused on informatics and information technology topics as well as a revision to the Clinical Informatics Resource Guide. The Informatics Committee also worked closely in 2017 with CAP accreditation programs on requirements from laboratories on IT interpretation of laboratory accreditation program checklist requirements. In addition, the committee’s active participation in standards development ensured that the needs of the laboratory were incorporated into laboratory information systems.

Data Drives Patient Care Decisions

With laboratories supplying the majority of data contained in a patient’s record, it is important for pathologists to understand the opportunities for data analysis within their organizations.

The Informatics Committee continued to develop resources for members, including numerous education courses focused on informatics and information technology topics as well as a revision to the Clinical Informatics Resource Guide. The Informatics Committee also worked closely in 2017 with CAP accreditation programs on requirements from laboratories on IT interpretation of laboratory accreditation program checklist requirements. In addition, the committee’s active participation in standards development ensured that the needs of the laboratory were incorporated into laboratory information systems.

Center Guidelines Improve Patient Care

The CAP’s Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center (the Center) expanded its impact in 2017, enhancing powerful new collaborations that benefit clinicians and patients. With the release of an evidence-based guideline for the evaluation of molecular biomarkers in colorectal cancer, the CAP collaborated with both clinical and laboratory partner organizations. This pivotal work guides targeted therapy decisions and advances personalized care for patients with colorectal cancer, which is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women and men combined in the US.

In a first for both organizations, the CAP partnered with the American Society of Hematology (ASH) to develop an evidence-based guideline to improve care for leukemia patients. This work underscores the essential steps for coordination and communication between pathologists and treating physicians for ensuring optimal patient outcomes.

Also in 2017, the Center published a critically needed guideline to ensure accurate testing and targeted treatment for patients with certain types of head and neck cancers.

Center Guidelines Improve Patient Care

The CAP’s Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center (the Center) expanded its impact in 2017, enhancing powerful new collaborations that benefit clinicians and patients. With the release of an evidence-based guideline for the evaluation of molecular biomarkers in colorectal cancer, the CAP collaborated with both clinical and laboratory partner organizations. This pivotal work guides targeted therapy decisions and advances personalized care for patients with colorectal cancer, which is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women and men combined in the US.

In a first for both organizations, the CAP partnered with the American Society of Hematology (ASH) to develop an evidence-based guideline to improve care for leukemia patients. This work underscores the essential steps for coordination and communication between pathologists and treating physicians for ensuring optimal patient outcomes.

Also in 2017, the Center published a critically needed guideline to ensure accurate testing and targeted treatment for patients with certain types of head and neck cancers.

Center Guidelines Improve Patient Care

The CAP’s Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center (the Center) expanded its impact in 2017, enhancing powerful new collaborations that benefit clinicians and patients.

With the release of an evidence-based guideline for the evaluation of molecular biomarkers in colorectal cancer, the CAP collaborated with both clinical and laboratory partner organizations. This pivotal work guides targeted therapy decisions and advances personalized care for patients with colorectal cancer, which is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women and men combined in the US.

In a first for both organizations, the CAP partnered with the American Society of Hematology (ASH) to develop an evidence-based guideline to improve care for leukemia patients. This work underscores the essential steps for coordination and communication between pathologists and treating physicians for ensuring optimal patient outcomes.

Also in 2017, the Center published a critically needed guideline to ensure accurate testing and targeted treatment for patients with certain types of head and neck cancers.

Living Our Quality Mission

Living Our Quality Mission

Living Our Quality Mission

8,027

CAP-accredited laboratories

2,371

pathologists participating in on-site inspections

22,480

laboratories using CAP proficiency testing