Influencing Public Policy

Influencing Public Policy

Influencing Public Policy

THE CAP FOUGHT TO PROTECT PATIENT HEALTH AND ENSURE FAIR REIMBURSEMENT FOR PATHOLOGISTS.

THE CAP FOUGHT TO PROTECT PATIENT HEALTH AND ENSURE FAIR REIMBURSEMENT FOR PATHOLOGISTS.

CAP Advocates for Patients and Pathologists

CAP Influences Congress on Surprise Bills

Countering a concerted effort by insurance companies to drive down payment to physicians, the CAP stood shoulder-to-shoulder with other specialists to protect the value of physician services delivered to patients. Representing pathologists, the CAP and its members sought to protect the right to be reimbursed fairly for out-of-network services and preserve the ability to negotiate fair contracts with insurers for services.

During the CAP’s annual Hill Day in May 2019, more than 80 pathologist members discussed how Congress could protect patients from surprise medical bills stemming from unexpected out-of-network care provided at in-network hospitals. Insurance companies have attempted to use the surprise billing issue to institute government-set pay rates for medical care provided out-of-network. At 160 meetings with congressional offices, CAP members asked legislators to:

  • Hold patients unexpectedly treated by out-of-network physicians financially harmless when insurers don’t cover care.
  • Set network adequacy standards requiring insurance companies to contract with the requisite number of providers needed for in-network hospitals.
  • Take patients out of the middle by creating a fair market out-of-network reimbursement rate using independent databases and a dispute resolution process.

In a major demonstration of advocacy strength, more than 1,500 pathologists then used the CAP’s grassroots action network to send 12,000 messages to congressional offices. They asked lawmakers to support their positions in legislation introduced in the House of Representatives. A targeted advertising campaign further augmented pathologists’ messages in publications read by policy influencers in Congress throughout the year. In July, lawmakers introduced legislation representing positions advocated by the CAP. By the end of 2019, more than 100 representatives, all contacted by the CAP, co-sponsored the legislation.

The CAP’s political action committee, PathPAC, kept pathologists’ messages visible and in central focus throughout the year. Member donations to PathPAC amplify the voices of all pathologists in Washington, DC. During 2019, PathPAC donated more than $215,000 to members of key congressional committees with jurisdiction over health care policy and leadership, as well as to doctors in or running for Congress. In addition to donating to PathPAC, CAP members also attended several in-district events with members of Congress, hosted fundraisers, and flew to Washington to join their elected officials at fundraisers.

More than 1,500 pathologists used the CAP’s grassroots action network to send 12,000 messages to congressional offices in an effort to protect patients from surprise medical bills.

CAP Fights to Protect Value of Pathology Services

The CAP strongly opposed actions by public and private insurance payers to decrease and diminish the value of pathology services to patients. Not only did the CAP fight efforts to cut reimbursements to pathologists, its direct actions in 2019 yielded increases in payment for pathologists.

For example, to correct practice expense variables used in Medicare reimbursement, the CAP submitted an extensive list of pathology supplies and equipment invoices to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Previously, the CMS reset prices for more than 2,000 medical supply and equipment items used to calculate payments for services on the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. However, the CAP found errors in several prices and sought to correct them. Because of the CAP’s advocacy and efforts, the CMS updated 36 direct practice expense supplies and equipment prices, adding $30 million to Medicare payment to pathology services.

The surgical pathology code 88307 in the Hospital Outpatient Payment System also came under threat. Initially, the CMS proposed lowering the Hospital Ambulatory Payment Classification for 88307 by 46%. However, after consideration of a CAP analysis, the CMS decided to maintain the ambulatory payment classification assignment for 88307 in 2020.

The CAP is already fighting scheduled cuts to pathologists in 2021 as a result of a new plan that reimburses evaluation and management (E/M) services at a higher rate and decreases payments to non-E/M services billed by specialists.

CAP Advocates for Patients and Pathologists

CAP Influences Congress on Surprise Bills

Countering a concerted effort by insurance companies to drive down payment to physicians, the CAP stood shoulder-to-shoulder with other specialists to protect the value of physician services delivered to patients. Representing pathologists, the CAP and its members sought to protect the right to be reimbursed fairly for out-of-network services and preserve the ability to negotiate fair contracts with insurers for services.

During the CAP’s annual Hill Day in May 2019, more than 80 pathologist members discussed how Congress could protect patients from surprise medical bills stemming from unexpected out-of-network care provided at in-network hospitals. Insurance companies have attempted to use the surprise billing issue to institute government-set pay rates for medical care provided out-of-network. At 160 meetings with congressional offices, CAP members asked legislators to:

  • Hold patients unexpectedly treated by out-of-network physicians financially harmless when insurers don’t cover care.
  • Set network adequacy standards requiring insurance companies to contract with the requisite number of providers needed for in-network hospitals.
  • Take patients out of the middle by creating a fair market out-of-network reimbursement rate using independent databases and a dispute resolution process.

In a major demonstration of advocacy strength, more than 1,500 pathologists then used the CAP’s grassroots action network to send 12,000 messages to congressional offices. They asked lawmakers to support their positions in legislation introduced in the House of Representatives. A targeted advertising campaign further augmented pathologists’ messages in publications read by policy influencers in Congress throughout the year. In July, lawmakers introduced legislation representing positions advocated by the CAP. By the end of 2019, more than 100 representatives, all contacted by the CAP, co-sponsored the legislation.

More than 1,500 pathologists used the CAP’s grassroots action network to send 12,000 messages to congressional offices in an effort to protect patients from surprise medical bills.

More than 1,500 pathologists used the CAP’s grassroots action network to send 12,000 messages to congressional offices in an effort to protect patients from surprise medical bills.

The CAP’s political action committee, PathPAC, kept pathologists’ messages visible and in central focus throughout the year. Member donations to PathPAC amplify the voices of all pathologists in Washington, DC. During 2019, PathPAC donated more than $215,000 to members of key congressional committees with jurisdiction over health care policy and leadership, as well as to doctors in or running for Congress. In addition to donating to PathPAC, CAP members also attended several in-district events with members of Congress, hosted fundraisers, and flew to Washington to join their elected officials at fundraisers.

CAP Fights to Protect Value of Pathology Services

The CAP strongly opposed actions by public and private insurance payers to decrease and diminish the value of pathology services to patients. Not only did the CAP fight efforts to cut reimbursements to pathologists, its direct actions in 2019 yielded increases in payment for pathologists.

For example, to correct practice expense variables used in Medicare reimbursement, the CAP submitted an extensive list of pathology supplies and equipment invoices to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Previously, the CMS reset prices for more than 2,000 medical supply and equipment items used to calculate payments for services on the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. However, the CAP found errors in several prices and sought to correct them. Because of the CAP’s advocacy and efforts, the CMS updated 36 direct practice expense supplies and equipment prices, adding $30 million to Medicare payment to pathology services.

The surgical pathology code 88307 in the Hospital Outpatient Payment System also came under threat. Initially, the CMS proposed lowering the Hospital Ambulatory Payment Classification for 88307 by 46%. However, after consideration of a CAP analysis, the CMS decided to maintain the ambulatory payment classification assignment for 88307 in 2020.

The CAP is already fighting scheduled cuts to pathologists in 2021 as a result of a new plan that reimburses evaluation and management (E/M) services at a higher rate and decreases payments to non-E/M services billed by specialists.

CAP Advocates for Patients and Pathologists

CAP Influences Congress on Surprise Bills

Countering a concerted effort by insurance companies to drive down payment to physicians, the CAP stood shoulder-to-shoulder with other specialists to protect the value of physician services delivered to patients.

Representing pathologists, the CAP and its members sought to protect the right to be reimbursed fairly for out-of-network services and preserve the ability to negotiate fair contracts with insurers for services.

During the CAP’s annual Hill Day in May 2019, more than 80 pathologist members discussed how Congress could protect patients from surprise medical bills stemming from unexpected out-of-network care provided at in-network hospitals. Insurance companies have attempted to use the surprise billing issue to institute government-set pay rates for medical care provided out-of-network. At 160 meetings with congressional offices, CAP members asked legislators to:

  • Hold patients unexpectedly treated by out-of-network physicians financially harmless when insurers don’t cover care.
  • Set network adequacy standards requiring insurance companies to contract with the requisite number of providers needed for in-network hospitals.
  • Take patients out of the middle by creating a fair market out-of-network reimbursement rate using independent databases and a dispute resolution process.

In a major demonstration of advocacy strength, more than 1,500 pathologists then used the CAP’s grassroots action network to send 12,000 messages to congressional offices. They asked lawmakers to support their positions in legislation introduced in the House of Representatives. A targeted advertising campaign further augmented pathologists’ messages in publications read by policy influencers in Congress throughout the year. In July, lawmakers introduced legislation representing positions advocated by the CAP. By the end of 2019, more than 100 representatives, all contacted by the CAP, co-sponsored the legislation.

The CAP’s political action committee, PathPAC, kept pathologists’ messages visible and in central focus throughout the year. Member donations to PathPAC amplify the voices of all pathologists in Washington, DC. During 2019, PathPAC donated more than $215,000 to members of key congressional committees with jurisdiction over health care policy and leadership, as well as to doctors in or running for Congress. In addition to donating to PathPAC, CAP members also attended several in-district events with members of Congress, hosted fundraisers, and flew to Washington to join their elected officials at fundraisers.

More than 1,500 pathologists used the CAP’s grassroots action network to send 12,000 messages to congressional offices in an effort to protect patients from surprise medical bills.

CAP Fights to Protect Value of Pathology Services

The CAP strongly opposed actions by public and private insurance payers to decrease and diminish the value of pathology services to patients. Not only did the CAP fight efforts to cut reimbursements to pathologists, its direct actions in 2019 yielded increases in payment for pathologists.

For example, to correct practice expense variables used in Medicare reimbursement, the CAP submitted an extensive list of pathology supplies and equipment invoices to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Previously, the CMS reset prices for more than 2,000 medical supply and equipment items used to calculate payments for services on the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. However, the CAP found errors in several prices and sought to correct them. Because of the CAP’s advocacy and efforts, the CMS updated 36 direct practice expense supplies and equipment prices, adding $30 million to Medicare payment to pathology services.

The surgical pathology code 88307 in the Hospital Outpatient Payment System also came under threat. Initially, the CMS proposed lowering the Hospital Ambulatory Payment Classification for 88307 by 46%. However, after consideration of a CAP analysis, the CMS decided to maintain the ambulatory payment classification assignment for 88307 in 2020.

The CAP is already fighting scheduled cuts to pathologists in 2021 as a result of a new plan that reimburses evaluation and management (E/M) services at a higher rate and decreases payments to non-E/M services billed by specialists.

CAP Battles for Fair Payments in the Courts

As part of its advocacy to protect the value of laboratory services, the CAP continued to support a lawsuit led by the American Clinical Laboratory Association (ACLA) against the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The suit sought to correct HHS execution of Medicare clinical laboratory fee schedule (CLFS) reforms. Previously, the CAP filed an amicus brief in support of ACLA’s appeal to overturn a US District Court’s decision that dismissed the lawsuit. ACLA, the CAP, and others argued that how the HHS defined the applicable laboratories required for data collection was, in practice, arbitrary and capricious.

A US Court of Appeals judge ruled in the CAP’s favor on July 30 by reversing the lower court’s decision to dismiss the case. The Court of Appeals stated that federal courts do have jurisdiction to decide the merits of a challenge to the federal government’s administration of CLFS reforms enacted in the Protecting Access to Medicare Act (PAMA) of 2014.

The 2014 PAMA law drastically changed the CLFS by requiring reimbursements for clinical laboratory services to be based on private rates. The CAP has sought to ensure these reimbursements are accurate and reflect all sectors of the clinical laboratory market. However, the CAP has found flaws in the private-market data collection process and subsequently advocated for changes to the PAMA statute and resulting regulatory implementation.

CAP Battles for Fair Payments in the Courts

As part of its advocacy to protect the value of laboratory services, the CAP continued to support a lawsuit led by the American Clinical Laboratory Association (ACLA) against the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The suit sought to correct HHS execution of Medicare clinical laboratory fee schedule (CLFS) reforms. Previously, the CAP filed an amicus brief in support of ACLA’s appeal to overturn a US District Court’s decision that dismissed the lawsuit. ACLA, the CAP, and others argued that how the HHS defined the applicable laboratories required for data collection was, in practice, arbitrary and capricious.

A US Court of Appeals judge ruled in the CAP’s favor on July 30 by reversing the lower court’s decision to dismiss the case. The Court of Appeals stated that federal courts do have jurisdiction to decide the merits of a challenge to the federal government’s administration of CLFS reforms enacted in the Protecting Access to Medicare Act (PAMA) of 2014.

The 2014 PAMA law drastically changed the CLFS by requiring reimbursements for clinical laboratory services to be based on private rates. The CAP has sought to ensure these reimbursements are accurate and reflect all sectors of the clinical laboratory market. However, the CAP has found flaws in the private-market data collection process and subsequently advocated for changes to the PAMA statute and resulting regulatory implementation.

CAP Battles for Fair Payments in the Courts

As part of its advocacy to protect the value of laboratory services, the CAP continued to support a lawsuit led by the American Clinical Laboratory Association (ACLA) against the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

The suit sought to correct HHS execution of Medicare clinical laboratory fee schedule (CLFS) reforms. Previously, the CAP filed an amicus brief in support of ACLA’s appeal to overturn a US District Court’s decision that dismissed the lawsuit. ACLA, the CAP, and others argued that how the HHS defined the applicable laboratories required for data collection was, in practice, arbitrary and capricious.

A US Court of Appeals judge ruled in the CAP’s favor on July 30 by reversing the lower court’s decision to dismiss the case. The Court of Appeals stated that federal courts do have jurisdiction to decide the merits of a challenge to the federal government’s administration of CLFS reforms enacted in the Protecting Access to Medicare Act (PAMA) of 2014.

The 2014 PAMA law drastically changed the CLFS by requiring reimbursements for clinical laboratory services to be based on private rates. The CAP has sought to ensure these reimbursements are accurate and reflect all sectors of the clinical laboratory market. However, the CAP has found flaws in the private-market data collection process and subsequently advocated for changes to the PAMA statute and resulting regulatory implementation.

Pathologists Quality Registry Hits More Than 1,000 Enrollees

In a demonstration of leadership, trust, and advocacy strength on behalf of pathologists, more than 1,000 pathologists chose the Pathologists Quality Registry in 2019. As the preeminent quality registry tool for pathologists, the Pathologists Quality Registry ensures practices can demonstrate their value and get paid fairly for the high-quality services they provide to patients.

The CAP developed the registry, first launched in 2017, to give pathologists the best opportunities for success in Medicare’s Quality Payment Program and the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). The Pathologists Quality Registry allows pathologists to stop payment penalties tied to MIPS by providing a consolidated platform for all their reporting needs, including benchmarking reports that can be used to improve quality and demonstrate pathologists’ value.

The CAP and its staff experts worked with more than 100 practices to provide one-on-one support to ensure their success in the MIPS program. Pathologists took advantage of the many ways of submitting data to the registry, including automated data integration with laboratory information systems, billing company data, or web data entry options.

Pathologists Quality Registry Hits More Than 1,000 Enrollees

In a demonstration of leadership, trust, and advocacy strength on behalf of pathologists, more than 1,000 pathologists chose the Pathologists Quality Registry in 2019. As the preeminent quality registry tool for pathologists, the Pathologists Quality Registry ensures practices can demonstrate their value and get paid fairly for the high-quality services they provide to patients.

The CAP developed the registry, first launched in 2017, to give pathologists the best opportunities for success in Medicare’s Quality Payment Program and the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). The Pathologists Quality Registry allows pathologists to stop payment penalties tied to MIPS by providing a consolidated platform for all their reporting needs, including benchmarking reports that can be used to improve quality and demonstrate pathologists’ value.

The CAP and its staff experts worked with more than 100 practices to provide one-on-one support to ensure their success in the MIPS program. Pathologists took advantage of the many ways of submitting data to the registry, including automated data integration with laboratory information systems, billing company data, or web data entry options.

Pathologists Quality Registry Hits More Than 1,000 Enrollees

In a demonstration of leadership, trust, and advocacy strength on behalf of pathologists, more than 1,000 pathologists chose the Pathologists Quality Registry in 2019. As the preeminent quality registry tool for pathologists, the Pathologists Quality Registry ensures practices can demonstrate their value and get paid fairly for the high-quality services they provide to patients.

The CAP developed the registry, first launched in 2017, to give pathologists the best opportunities for success in Medicare’s Quality Payment Program and the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). The Pathologists Quality Registry allows pathologists to stop payment penalties tied to MIPS by providing a consolidated platform for all their reporting needs, including benchmarking reports that can be used to improve quality and demonstrate pathologists’ value.

The CAP and its staff experts worked with more than 100 practices to provide one-on-one support to ensure their success in the MIPS program. Pathologists took advantage of the many ways of submitting data to the registry, including automated data integration with laboratory information systems, billing company data, or web data entry options.

CAP Supports State Pathology Societies

To strengthen the pathology profession nationwide, the CAP partnered with state pathology societies to bolster advocacy efforts at the local level. In recent years, the CAP’s state advocacy program has worked with pathology societies in dozens of state capitals to support legislation that improves patient access to pathology services and reduces administrative burdens on laboratories. Specifically, the CAP has partnered with state pathology societies on the initiatives described below.

CAP Supports State Pathology Societies

To strengthen the pathology profession nationwide, the CAP partnered with state pathology societies to bolster advocacy efforts at the local level. In recent years, the CAP’s state advocacy program has worked with pathology societies in dozens of state capitals to support legislation that improves patient access to pathology services and reduces administrative burdens on laboratories.  Specifically, the CAP has partnered with state pathology societies on the initiatives described below.

CAP/STATE PATHOLOGY PARTNERSHIPS

Network Adequacy and Out-of-Network Billing

Advocacy on health plan network adequacy and out-of-network billing achieved results last year. Fourteen states enacted out-of-network billing legislation and regulation benefitting patients and pathologists: Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia.

In particular, Washington became the 15th state to enact a law protecting patients from the additional costs of out-of-network physician services at in-network hospitals and the third state to enact a statutory requirement holding health plans accountable for hospital-based physician network adequacy.

The CAP assisted the Texas Society of Pathologists with legislative language to ensure an out-of-network law did not raise scope of practice concerns and provided pathologists with an arbitration system to resolve payment disputes with health plans.

The New Mexico Society of Pathologists and the CAP successfully averted passage of an out-of-network payment formula that could have slashed reimbursement for certain pathology services. Specifically, the proposed formula would have established payment at the 60th percentile of health plan allowed rates, based upon data derived from an independent database.

In response to concerns raised by the Arizona Society of Pathologists and the CAP, the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System amended its standards for assessing Medicaid managed care organizations to address the need for adequate access to pathology and laboratory services.

Genetic/Molecular Testing

Also in Arizona, a new law established pathologists’ legal authority to order genetic/molecular testing on patient specimens without an additional informed consent requirement.

Out-of-State Second Opinions

Because of one CAP member’s advocacy, North Dakota enacted legislation effectively allowing patients to receive second opinions from out-of-state pathologists and physicians without the requirement for state licensure. Mary Ann Sens, MD, PhD, FCAP, is credited with leading the legislation’s passage on behalf of the CAP.

CAP/STATE PATHOLOGY PARTNERSHIPS

Network Adequacy and Out-of-Network Billing

Advocacy on health plan network adequacy and out-of-network billing achieved results last year. Fourteen states enacted out-of-network billing legislation and regulation benefitting patients and pathologists: Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia.

In particular, Washington became the 15th state to enact a law protecting patients from the additional costs of out-of-network physician services at in-network hospitals and the third state to enact a statutory requirement holding health plans accountable for hospital-based physician network adequacy.

The CAP assisted the Texas Society of Pathologists with legislative language to ensure an out-of-network law did not raise scope of practice concerns and provided pathologists with an arbitration system to resolve payment disputes with health plans.

The New Mexico Society of Pathologists and the CAP successfully averted passage of an out-of-network payment formula that could have slashed reimbursement for certain pathology services. Specifically, the proposed formula would have established payment at the 60th percentile of health plan allowed rates, based upon data derived from an independent database.

In response to concerns raised by the Arizona Society of Pathologists and the CAP, the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System amended its standards for assessing Medicaid managed care organizations to address the need for adequate access to pathology and laboratory services.

Genetic/Molecular Testing

Also in Arizona, a new law established pathologists’ legal authority to order genetic/molecular testing on patient specimens without an additional informed consent requirement.

Out-of-State Second Opinions

Because of one CAP member’s advocacy, North Dakota enacted legislation effectively allowing patients to receive second opinions from out-of-state pathologists and physicians without the requirement for state licensure. Mary Ann Sens, MD, PhD, FCAP, is credited with leading the legislation’s passage on behalf of the CAP.

CAP Supports State Pathology Societies

In recent years, the CAP’s state advocacy program has worked with pathology societies in dozens of state capitals to support legislation that improves patient access to pathology services and reduces administrative burdens on laboratories.

Specifically, the CAP has partnered with state pathology societies on the initiatives described below.

policy_m_state_path_partner_map_naonb
policy_dt_map_dot-line_dkblue2x

Network Adequacy and Out-of-Network Billing

Advocacy on health plan network adequacy and out-of-network billing achieved results last year. Fourteen states enacted out-of-network billing legislation and regulation benefitting patients and pathologists: Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia.

In particular, Washington became the 15th state to enact a law protecting patients from the additional costs of out-of-network physician services at in-network hospitals and the third state to enact a statutory requirement holding health plans accountable for hospital-based physician network adequacy.

The CAP assisted the Texas Society of Pathologists with legislative language to ensure an out-of-network law did not raise scope of practice concerns and provided pathologists with an arbitration system to resolve payment disputes with health plans.

The New Mexico Society of Pathologists and the CAP successfully averted passage of an out-of-network payment formula that could have slashed reimbursement for certain pathology services. Specifically, the proposed formula would have established payment at the 60th percentile of health plan allowed rates, based upon data derived from an independent database.

In response to concerns raised by the Arizona Society of Pathologists and the CAP, the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System amended its standards for assessing Medicaid managed care organizations to address the need for adequate access to pathology and laboratory services.

policy_m_state_path_partner_map_genetic_testing
policy_dt_map_dot-line_black2x

Genetic/Molecular Testing

Also in Arizona, a new law established pathologists’ legal authority to order genetic/molecular testing on patient specimens without an additional informed consent requirement.

policy_m_state_path_partner_map_genetic_osso
policy_dt_map_dot-line_ltgray2x

Out-of-State Second Opinions

Because of one CAP member’s advocacy, North Dakota enacted legislation effectively allowing patients to receive second opinions from out-of-state pathologists and physicians without the requirement for state licensure. Mary Ann Sens, MD, PhD, FCAP, is credited with leading the legislation’s passage on behalf of the CAP.

2019 Practice Characteristics Survey Report

The CAP published the 2019 Practice Characteristics Survey, providing a primary source of basic data on board-certified pathologists, how they practice, and how they are being compensated.

AVERAGE TIME SPENT DURING A PARTICULAR WORKWEEK

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PATHOLOGIST PRACTICE SETTINGS

policy_2019_practice_settings_graph_dt

NOTE: Other includes government-owned facility, forensic laboratory and autopsy center, blood center or bank

PATHOLOGIST PRACTICE SETTINGS

policy_m_2019_practice_settings

NOTE: Other includes government-owned facility, forensic laboratory and autopsy center, blood center or bank

2019 Practice Characteristics Survey Report

The CAP published the 2019 Practice Characteristics Survey, providing a primary source of basic data on board-certified pathologists, how they practice, and how they are being compensated.

The 2019 survey, which was the 11th edition since 1994, also tracked changes that occurred in the workforce among board-certified pathologists.

AVERAGE TIME SPENT DURING A PARTICULAR WORKWEEK

policy_pie_graph_dt

PATHOLOGIST PRACTICE SETTINGS

policy_m_2019_practice_settings

NOTE: Other includes government-owned facility, forensic laboratory and autopsy center, blood center or bank